The Budget

Reduce, Reuse, Colorcycle

New program converts used expo markers into energy source

OPPORTUNITY+%E2%80%94+Expo+markers+are+collected+in+AP+Environmental+Science+and+Biology+teacher+Lisa+Ball%E2%80%99s+room+this+year.+According+to+Crayola%2C+%E2%80%9CColorCycle+is+also+a+great+opportunity+for+teachers+and+their+students+to+explore+eco-friendly+practices.%E2%80%9D+
OPPORTUNITY — Expo markers are collected in AP Environmental Science and Biology teacher Lisa Ball’s room this year. According to Crayola, “ColorCycle is also a great opportunity for teachers and their students to explore eco-friendly practices.”

OPPORTUNITY — Expo markers are collected in AP Environmental Science and Biology teacher Lisa Ball’s room this year. According to Crayola, “ColorCycle is also a great opportunity for teachers and their students to explore eco-friendly practices.”

Sam Webb

Sam Webb

OPPORTUNITY — Expo markers are collected in AP Environmental Science and Biology teacher Lisa Ball’s room this year. According to Crayola, “ColorCycle is also a great opportunity for teachers and their students to explore eco-friendly practices.”

By Symon Knox, Staff Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Crayola launched the ColorCycle initiative in 2013 to take advantage of discarded markers, and this year, LHS participated in the program. 

ColorCycle is a program where teachers across the nation set up stations to collect used markers. Science teacher Lisa Ball started the initiative at Lawrence High. 

“I was able to find the program because I’m a part of an online community of teachers that teach AP Environmental Science, and it was circulating on there,” Ball said.

 To recycle markers, visit the collection bucket in room 218 or in the teacher workroom located in the main office. ColorCycle uses a process to convert markers to energy, and the process repurposes the entire marker, no matter what type. This way, less plastic waste is dumped into the environment.

“It feels great just to know that something that you use regularly can be recycled,” Ball said. “I feel guilty a lot of times for using plastic products, but there isn’t really a good alternative to Dry Erase markers, so at least if I can’t stop using plastic markers, they won’t end up in the ocean circling the globe.” 

About the Writer
Symon Knox, Writer
HI:) My name is Symon and I’m a junior. I’m in portfolio photography and I love art. I spend most of my free time watching Netflix, and hanging out with friends, I also take a lot of photos, but I like to write too. Print
Leave a Comment
Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Reduce, Reuse, Colorcycle

    News

    Architecture students plan coffee shop for renovated building

  • Reduce, Reuse, Colorcycle

    News

    Kansas Legislature forced to raise school budget again

  • Reduce, Reuse, Colorcycle

    News

    High school students vaping has become increasingly popular

  • News

    Water Warriors

  • Reduce, Reuse, Colorcycle

    News

    Spring play success despite limited rehearsal time

  • Reduce, Reuse, Colorcycle

    News

    Conductor Says Goodbye

  • Reduce, Reuse, Colorcycle

    Briefs

    Going out in Stile

  • Reduce, Reuse, Colorcycle

    News

    LHS Latin students compete at Kansas State Latin Convention

  • Reduce, Reuse, Colorcycle

    Multimedia

    SAFER participates in national walkout

  • News

    LHS student wins trip to Germany after scoring a 96% on the National German Exam

The School Newspaper of Lawrence High School.
Reduce, Reuse, Colorcycle